Showing 4 posts in Cooperation.

[UPDATE] In Defense of Genger, Part II

UPDATE:

I hate to say I told you so, but...wait, no I don't.

Yesterday, the Delaware Supreme Court issued its opinion in this matter affirming the Court of Chancery's spoliation finding. The Court held the spoliation finding proper, because Genger took affirmative steps to overwrite unallocated space, saying:

We do not read the Court of Chancery’s Spoliation Opinion to hold that as a matter of routine document-retention procedures, a computer hard drive’s unallocated free space must always be preserved. The trial court rested its spoliation and contempt findings on more specific and narrow factual grounds—that Genger, despite knowing he had a duty to preserve documents, intentionally took affirmative actions to destroy several relevant documents on his work computer. These actions prevented the Trump Group from recovering those deleted documents for use in the Section 225…

Compare with my statements below that

The [Court of Chancery] opinion in this case does not require preservation of all unallocated space in every case. Genger was sanctioned because he took affirmative steps to overwrite unallocated space, in violation of the Court's order... [T]here is nothing in this opinion that creates any requirement to preserve unallocated space. Rather, the opinion only says you shouldn't go out of your way to destroy it.

I feel quite vindicated in my defense, considering there were some persons and organizations of import in the eDiscovery community lined up on the other side. Obviously, reasonable minds can disagree, especially in interpreting court decisions. Ultimately, I am thankful that the Supreme Court's decision should allay any fears created by certain interpretations of the Court of Chancery's spoliation decision.

ORIGINAL POST (2011-03-11 13:20:45):

I had almost given up on writing this post considering how long it has been since I posted In Defense of Genger, Part I and (more importantly) how long it has been since the publication of the posts I am taking issue with.  However, the ongoing confusion about this case has prompted me to action.

If you have read Part I, you are familiar with the Court of Chancery's decision in TR Investors LLC v. Genger, C.A. 3994-VCS (December 9, 2009) and with the allegations made by Leonard Deutchman, General Counsel at LDiscovery LLC, in a two-part post hosted by Law.com. <!--You also understand why there's a picture of Austin Powers.--> For those who are not familiar, Mr. Deutchman asserts that the Court got the decision wrong because it (1) does not understand the technology involved (Part 1) and (2) does not understand the law of eDiscovery (Part 2).

It's sufficient to say that I respectfully disagree with Mr. Deutchman on both charges. Rebutting his posts was a fun, interesting exercise for me, but it didn't seem terribly important. I saw it as an esoteric debate between eDiscovery geeks. That has changed, because, today, a prominent media outlet has published a post that elevates the confusion about this opinion and will cause unnecessary fear among corporate counsel.

The latest case of hand-wringing and confusion over this decision comes to us from none other than Forbes by way of Daniel Fisher's post "Delaware Ruling Would Require Massive Data Backups."  Mr. Fisher opens his post stating that:

A little-noticed decision by a Delaware court has the potential to impose huge costs on companies unless it is reversed, computer-security experts say...[e]xperts say retaining such data would be prohibitively expensive since the unallocated space is essentially a trash bin that is altered each time a key is tapped.

<!--Scary, huh?-->

Despite the fact that Mr. Fisher twice refers to "experts" (plural) as the source for these hyper-ventilations, his lone identified source for the post is Daniel Garrie, a lawyer and managing director at Focused Solution Recourse Delivery Group LLC , a computer consulting firm in Seattle. <!--Garrie and Deutchman are both lawyers with eDiscovery vendors. Is there anything to that?--> Mr. Fisher's post continues:

“It’s almost impossible for large companies with massive amounts of equipment to comply,” said Garrie... “I don’t even know if it’s possible,” said Garrie. “I mean, anything’s possible with enough money,” but companies would have to take bit-level images of their hard drives on a regular basis and store them somewhere, to be retrieved each time they are sued. That means all the time for most large companies. The costs would be “exponentially larger,” than current electronic discovery measures. “Several large global companies,” clients he declined to name, “have expressed concern.”

Let me clear up the confusion: The opinion in this case does not require preservation of all unallocated space in every case. Genger was sanctioned because he took affirmative steps to overwrite unallocated space, in violation of the Court's order and without first telling anyone. The routine, passive overwriting of unallocated space was NOT the cause for any sanctions here, so there is nothing in this opinion that creates any requirement to preserve unallocated space. Rather, the opinion only says you shouldn't go out of your way to destroy it. Big, BIG difference. <!--If there are doubts about the Court of Chancery's understanding of eDiscovery, please see their recently released "Guidelines for Preservation of Electronically Stored Information" that clearly embraces the principles of cooperation, reasonableness, and proportionality.-->

To Mr. Garrie's credit, he is consistent—he is co-author of an article in the Northwestern Journal of Technology and Intellectual Property that makes the same mistaken arguments, and he filed a brief with the Delaware Supreme Court arguing for reversal of the Genger opinion. I obviously disagree with Mr. Garrie's opinions on this matter, but I am here to help, so I say:

Mr. Garrie, for the “[s]everal large global companies [that] have expressed concern,” please send them a link to this post and tell them not to worry.

I don't actually expect Mr. Garrie will do that, but perhaps some of his clients will stumble upon this post, in which case here is my advice to them:

If you act cooperatively and transparently, you will be fine. If you find yourself in a similar position to Mr. Genger's, share your concerns with opposing counsel and the court before you do anything. Don't take matters into your own hands and violate a court order by wiping a hard drive in the middle of the night—it's bad form and will only get you in trouble.

Stayed tuned for the decision of the Delaware Supreme Court—I may have a lot of words to eat...

<!--Thanks to flickr user cliff1066™ for the Austin Powers pic.-->

The Tenth Circuit Speaks!

Posted In Cooperation

No doubt jealous of all the attention our beloved Judge Shira Scheindlin receives, two days ago U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit Judge Neil M. Gorsuch issued an order in Lee v. Max International, LLC affirming a terminating sanction in discovery. Woo hoo!

In one fell swoop, Judge Gorsuch does the following:

"You're Out Bonds!"

1) Establishes a "3 Strikes and You're Out!" rule:

How many times can a litigant ignore his discovery obligations before his misconduct catches up with him? The plaintiffs in this case failed to produce documents in response to a discovery request. Then they proceeded to violate not one but two judicial orders compelling production of the requested materials.

After patiently affording the plaintiffs chance after chance, the district court eventually found the intransigence intolerable and dismissed the case as sanction. We affirm. Our justice system has a strong preference for resolving cases on their merits whenever possible, but no one... should count on more than three chances to make good a discovery obligation. (emphasis added)

2) Enlightens us on the karma of discovery:"...bad deeds eventually tend to catch up with us..."

[T]here is such thing as discovery karma. Discovery misconduct often may be seen as tactically advantageous at first. But just as our good and bad deeds eventually tend to catch up with us, so do discovery machinations.

3) Establishes the "gimlet eye" standard of review:

We view challenges to a district court’s discovery sanctions order with a gimlet eye.

The Gimlet Eye!The lesson: Don't mess with District Judges and Magistrates in discovery.

Read the coverage at Above the Law where ALL YOUR DOCS ARE BELONG TO US.

<!--Thanks to flickr user Andrew Scott for the Gimlet Eye pic (to the left).-->

<!--Thanks to flickr user Malingering for the grand pic of Barry Bonds striking out!-->

Hitler Explains Why RIM Matters

UPDATE: Now I'm ticked! The video below, and all other Hitler "Downfall" parodies, have been pulled from YouTube.  The removal comes per a takedown demand issued by the film's owner Constantin Films, claiming the videos infringed on the copyright. Boo! Hiss!

I am not an IP attorney, so this is not legal advice, but it seems to me that these videos are fair use of copyrighted material.  What's more, Constantin Films clearly does not understand social media—I added Downfall to my Netflix queue because of these parodies.  I otherwise never would have heard of the film.  Constantin Films: THESE VIDEOS ARE HELPING YOU! DUH.

Then again, this takedown dustup is creating even more publicity...hmmm...

 

ORIGINAL POST: Yesterday, on the e-Disclosure Information Project blog, Chris Dale's post Hitler and Cloud Computing Security gives us a super discovery-related entry in the crowded and growing "Hitler and..." series of spoofs.  I can't get enough of these videos and was giddy <!-- That's right, I said giddy.  I'm easily amused. --> to find a related gem on YouTube just days ago, in which Hitler laments the exclusion of records management from the discovery process.  Brilliant.

[embed]http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/YsTNNrJUwWI&hl=en_US&fs=1&color1=0x2b405b&color2=0x6b8ab6[/embed]

3rd Circuit Doesn't Dig 'Hiding the Ball' Game

Posted In Cooperation

In a case squarely pitting cooperation against adversarial discovery practices, a unanimous three-judge panel of the 3rd Circuit was not amused by defense counsels' obstructionism. Two of the three judges on the panel are members of the Delaware Bar: Judges Thomas L. Ambro and Kent A. Jordan.

[T]he defense lawyers walk away unsanctioned, but their victory didn't come without a price. Having taken the appeal to remove any smudge on their reputations, they succeeded in their two key legal arguments, but were made to endure a lecture on ethics and civility from the 3rd Circuit panel in a reported decision.

In the opening paragraphs of her 50-page opinion, Judge Dolores K. Sloviter set a tone of disappointment and finger-wagging. And she directed her ire at both defense counsel and the plaintiffs attorneys.

"It would be reasonable to expect ... that experienced attorneys, especially those who have handled major litigation, would be able to proceed through the discovery and pretrial stages with a conciliatory attitude and a minimum of obstruction, and that, under the guiding hand of the district court, the path to ultimate disposition would be a relatively smooth one," Sloviter wrote.

But the Grider case, Sloviter said, "shows exactly the opposite."

Joined by Judges Thomas L. Ambro and Kent A. Jordan, Sloviter found that "the spirit of the discovery disputes was hostile. At the very least, it lacked the civility and professionalism one expects from such experienced attorneys." The parties, Sloviter said, "were unable to reach agreement on even minor matters and the discovery was noncompliant, delayed, or protracted" and the "bickering among the parties ensured that the deadlines would not be met."

Hide the Ball trickMagicians and (some) lawyers say: "Have ball, will hide."