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Summaries and analysis of recent Delaware court decisions concerning business-related litigation.

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Showing 82 posts in Books and Records.

Court Of Chancery Rejects Attorney-Driven Books And Records Demand

Posted In Books and Records

Wilkinson v. A. Schulman, Inc., C.A. No. 2017-0138-VCL (Nov. 13, 2017)

This decision has potential far-reaching consequences for shareholder-plaintiff litigation. As is well known, some entrepreneurial plaintiff-side corporate law firms advertise that they are “investigating” matters following a corporation’s report of some misfortune. That is done to attract a stockholder as a potential client. They then use that client’s status as a stockholder of the corporation to bring suit or, often, to demand an inspection under Section 220 of the DGCL of the books and records they need to support a well-pled complaint. This decision holds that when the demand is really generated by the law firm, and not the client, inspection will be denied for failure of an actual “proper purpose.” The case turned on its facts showing that the client had no real interest in what the law firm wanted to investigate. While some will argue that problem may be cured by a better “informed” client, that perhaps is too cynical. We shall see if this decision makes it harder for such plaintiff-side firms to bring such cases in the future.

Court of Chancery Imposes Incorporation By Reference Condition On Books and Records Production

Posted In Books and Records

The City Of Cambridge Retirement System v. Universal Health Services Inc., C.A. No. 2017-0322-SG (Oct. 12, 2017)

A stockholder may inspect a corporation’s records for any recognized proper purpose, including investigating alleged mismanagement. If that stockholder later files a complaint based on the records produced, must the stockholder agree that any reviewing court may consider all those records in ruling on a motion to dismiss rather than being limited to the complaint’s allegations? Under this decision, and a similar decision in the Yahoo! litigation, yes, potentially. While this decision notes that such a condition is within the Court’s discretion, the language of the opinion suggests that condition will be granted as a matter of course.

Court Of Chancery Protects Privilege In Books and Records Action And Addresses Corwin’s Effect On Mismanagement Investigation Claims

Posted In Books and Records

Salberg v. Genworth Financial Inc., C.A. No. 2017-0018-JRS (July 27, 2017)

This is an important decision for its analyses implicating the Garner and Corwin rules.  The Garner rule is that, under certain narrow circumstances where the plaintiff establishes good cause, the attorney-client privilege will be unavailable to corporate fiduciaries who are defending against claims brought by the stockholders who are the object of their fiduciary duties.  Here, the Court of Chancery declined to invoke the Garner rule and protected the attorney-client privilege in a books and records case where the same stockholders were already pursuing derivative litigation against the company on the same subject as the records demand but could not gain access under Garner in that earlier litigation. More ›

Court Of Chancery Explains Stock Restriction Law

Posted In Books and Records

Henry v. Phixios Holdings Inc., C.A. No. 12504-VCMR (July 10, 2017)

This is the rare decision explaining when restrictions on stock transfers (permitted by Section 202 of the DGCL) can be enforced. While the statute seems clear enough, the real lesson from this decision is that it might be difficult to show a stockholder had advanced knowledge of restrictions that are not on the stock certificate when no other written notice exists. Without such advanced knowledge or later assent by the stockholder, the restrictions are not enforceable.

Court of Chancery Explains When There Is A Basis To Investigate

Posted In Books and Records

T.J. Rogers v. Cypress Semiconductor Corp., C.A. No. 2017-0070-AGB (April 17, 2017)

This decision does a good job of explaining when there is an adequate showing of possible wrongdoing sufficient to justify a books and records inspection. It also explains why conducting a proxy contest does not warrant denying inspection.

Court of Chancery Holds That A Books And Records Plaintiff Must Be A Stockholder At The Time Of Suit

Posted In Books and Records

Weingarten v. Monster Worldwide Inc., C.A. 12931-VCG (Feb. 27, 2017)

This decision resolved a matter of first impression: a plaintiff seeking corporate records under Section 220 of the DGCL must be a stockholder at the time he files his complaint to have standing.  Thus, when a stockholder makes a proper Section 220 demand, and a merger terminates his ownership interest in the corporation before he files his books and records action, the now-former stockholder loses standing to sue.  In short, stockholder-plaintiffs must be diligent in pursuing their record demands to avoid losing standing.

Court Of Chancery Holds That Wrong Forward Looking Statement Insufficient To Support Records Inspection

Posted In Books and Records

Haque v. Tesla Motors Inc., C.A. 12651-VCS (February 2, 2017)

It is not enough that certain forward-looking statements failed to come true to justify requiring an inspection of corporate records. More evidence of wrongdoing is needed if your inspection is based on a theory of mismanagement.

Court Of Chancery Denies Inspection When The Board Has An Obvious Defense To A Claim Of Wrongdoing

Posted In Books and Records

Beatrice Corwin Living Irrevocable Trust v. Pfizer, C.A. 10425-JL (Del. Ch. Aug. 31, 2016, corrected Sept. 1, 2016)

In general, the bar is low for exercising inspection rights to investigate claims of wrongdoing.  Plaintiffs need provide only some evidence to suggest a credible basis from which the Court can infer possible mismanagement or wrongdoing.  But as this decision holds, when there is an obvious defense to the claim, such as the board’s reliance on an audit firm for a complicated accounting issue, inspection may be denied.

Court of Chancery Denies Director Full Inspection Rights

Posted In Books and Records

Bizzari v. Suburban Waste Services Inc., C. A. No. 10709-JL (Del. Ch. Aug. 30, 2016)

This is an almost unprecedented decision to limit the inspection rights of a corporate director. Directors generally have “essentially unfettered” access to the corporate records to fulfill their fiduciary roles.  Here, given the director’s improper motive to use the records to compete with or harm the corporation, the result is entirely justified under the bizarre set of facts.

Court Of Chancery Explains Inspection Rights For A Statutory Trust

Posted In Books and Records

Grand Acquisition LLC v. Passco Indian Springs DST, C.A. 12003-VCMR (Del. Ch. Aug. 26, 2016, revised Sept. 7, 2016)

This is the first decision examining the right to inspect the records of a Delaware Statutory Trust. Applying settled law from decisions in the LLP and LLC context regarding whether to read statutory and contractual inspection rights as separate and independent, the Court held that a contractual right to inspection is not subject to the conditions in the trust statute (Section 3819) unless the Trust language says so.  The Court also held that defending against the inspection on the grounds of an improper purpose requires proof of probable harm to the trust if the Court allowed the inspection.

Court Of Chancery Limits Inspection To A Real Stockholder

Posted In Books and Records

Pogue v. Hybrid Energy Inc., C.A. 111563-VCG (August 5, 2016)

This decision holds that when stock issued is void, the recipient is not entitled to records inspection even if he is listed as a stockholder on the company's stock ledger.

Court Of Chancery Explains Inspection Rights In An LLC

Posted In Books and Records

RED Capital Investment L.P.  v. RED Partner LLC, C.A. 11575-VCN (February 11, 2016)

This is an interesting decision because it explains inspection rights in the LLC context under the two different standards set out in Section 18-305(a) and (b) of the LLC Act. As expected, it is better to seek inspection as a manager than as a member.  Managers have similar “unfettered” access to company books and records as corporate directors, absent restrictions in the LLC agreement.  Also notable, inspection rights may include the books and records of subsidiaries, under the right circumstances.  

Court Of Chancery Imposes An “Incorporation Condition” On A Stockholder’s Books And Records Inspection

Posted In Books and Records

Amalgamated Bank v. Yahoo! Inc., C.A. 10774-VCL (February 2, 2016)

This is a precedent-setting decision in the books and records context. In it, the Court imposes an “Incorporation Condition” on the stockholder’s inspection. That is, a stockholder who establishes a credible basis to inspect corporate records for the purpose of investigating alleged wrongdoing must agree -- as a condition to the inspection -- that all the documents it inspects will be deemed incorporated by reference in any later-filed derivative complaint. More ›

Court Of Chancery Explains Director Right To Information And What Communications Qualify As Corporate Books and Records

Posted In Books and Records

Chammas v. NavLink, Inc., C.A. 11265-VCN (February 1, 2016)

This is one of those scarce cases dealing with director access to a corporation’s books and records. After all, Delaware law provides directors with an almost unlimited right to a corporation’s records needed for them to exercise their  fiduciary duties. Hence, these cases are rare. More ›

Court Of Chancery Dismisses Case For Failure To Pursue Records

Posted In Books and Records

Thermopylae Capital Partners LP v. Simbol, Inc., C.A. 10619-VCG (January 29, 2016)

The Court of Chancery expects a plaintiff to supply those facts necessary to state a claim in reasonable detail, particularly when those essential facts might be obtained by an inspection of an entity’s records. Here the Court dismissed a complaint for its failure to state those facts that would have been evident from a records inspection and when the absence of those facts made the complaint  too difficult to understand.