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Showing 300 posts in Breach of Contract.

Chancery Decision Explains Availability of Reformation as a Targeted Remedy

Posted In Breach of Contract, Chancery, Equitable Remedies, Fraud


AECOM, et al. v. SCCI Nat’l Hldgs., Inc., C.A. No. 2022-0727-MTZ (Del. Ch. Sept. 27, 2023)
Although the Court of Chancery frequently resolves contractual disputes, it grants contractual reformation only when “intervention [is necessary] to ensure the deal is what the parties agreed upon.” This pleadings-stage decision provides insight into the Court’s approach to reformation because the Court found that one claim supported reformation but the other did not. More ›

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Chancery Finds Defendants Liable for Fraud Based on the Failure to Disclose Internal Billing Practices

Posted In Breach of Contract, Chancery, Fraud, M&A


NetApp Inc. v. Cinelli, C.A. No. 2020-1000-LWW (Del. Ch. Aug. 2, 2023)
This decision arose out of the sale of the company Cloud Jumper to NetApp, Inc. The seller’s management had been recording internal software use as revenue in its unaudited financial statements but never disclosed this practice to the buyer in the sale’s process. In this post-trial opinion, in addition to breaches of contract, the Court of Chancery held that the defendants were liable for fraud because they failed to disclose internal billing practices that created the appearance of higher company revenue. The Court reasoned that this failure constituted common law fraud because the defendants had a duty to speak regarding the billing practice, there was circumstantial evidence that they had scienter to commit fraud due to their knowledge of the internal billing practice, and the plaintiffs relied on the financial data that reflected the billing practice when considering whether to pursue the deal. The decision also reflects a detailed analysis of damages and expert testimony related to the misrepresentations. 

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Chancery Relies on Unanimous Dictionary Entries To Confirm Unambiguity of Supply Agreement

Posted In Breach of Contract, Chancery



Thermo Fisher Scientific PSG Corp. v. Arranta Bio MA, LLC, C.A. No. 2022-0608-NAC (Del. Ch. Apr. 4, 2023)
The plaintiff and the defendant entered into a supply agreement under which the defendant would manufacture plasmids, a central component for a variety of therapies and vaccines. The agreement included a non-compete provision that would require the defendant to pause its plasmid activities for three years if the defendant was acquired by one of the plaintiff's competitors—defined as a company deriving at least fifty percent of revenue from "biopharmaceutical" development or commercial manufacturing services. The agreement did not define the term "biopharmaceutical." Two years into the agreement, a third party acquired the defendant. The acquirer derived almost all its revenue in connection with small-molecule drugs, with almost no revenue connected to biologics. Plaintiff filed suit, alleging that the acquirer was a competitor and seeking specific performance of the non-compete provision. More ›

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Chancery Orders Defendant to Pay Simple Prejudgment Interest and Reduces the Amount Because of Plaintiffs’ Delays

Posted In Breach of Contract, Chancery


Ainslie v. Cantor Fitzgerald LP, C.A. No. 9436-VCZ (Del. Ch. Apr. 5, 2023)
Delaware law provides for the interest to be awarded under 6 Del. C. § 2301 in actions seeking compensatory damages, and the rate is fixed by the statute. The Court of Chancery has discretion, however, to adjust the rate and form of interest “as equity requires.” In this case, the Court awards Plaintiffs simple interest and reduces the amount because of the Plaintiffs’ inordinate delays in prosecuting the case. More ›

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Supreme Court Affirms Chancery’s Interpretation of Word “And” in Option Agreements

Posted In Breach of Contract, Delaware Supreme Court, Restrictive Covenants


Weinberg v. Waystar, Inc., No. 274, 2022 (Del. March 16, 2023)
The appellant was a former chief marketing officer of the appellee, a Delaware corporation. Soon after her termination, the appellant timely exercised her equity options and converted them to partnership units. The appellee thereafter exercised its call rights to repurchase the units. The appellant filed suit, arguing that the use of the word "and” in the options agreements meant that both of two conditions (termination of employment and breach of a restrictive covenant) had to be satisfied before the appellee could exercise its call rights. The Court of Chancery ruled in favor of the appellee, finding that "and” meant either of the two conditions would trigger the appellee's call rights. More ›

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Chancery Finds Payment Condition, Non-Compete, and Non-Solicit Provisions Unenforceable

Posted In Breach of Contract, Chancery, LLCs/LLPs, Restrictive Covenants


Ainslie et al. v. Cantor Fitzgerald, L.P., C.A. No. 9436-VCZ (Del. Ch. Jan. 4, 2023)
Under Delaware law, restrictive covenants generally are enforceable unless overly broad in the circumstances, and Delaware courts closely scrutinize them. Similarly, contractual conditions precedent generally are enforceable unless they result in a penalty, and Delaware courts construe ambiguous conditions narrowly to avoid forfeitures. In this decision from the Court of Chancery, a provision in a limited liability partnership agreement intended to discourage competitive activities by former partners was held unenforceable both because it was overly broad and resulted in a forfeiture.
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Chancery Trims Contract Claims in Post-Merger Dispute

Posted In Breach of Contract, Chancery, Implied Covenant, LLCs, M&A


In Re P3 Health Group Holdings, LLC, Consol. C.A. 2021-0518-JTL (Del. Ch. Oct. 31, 2022)
Plaintiff Hudson Vegas Investment SPV, LLC asserted various claims after its minority interest in Defendant P3 Health Group Holdings, LLC was wiped out in a business combination between P3 and a SPAC. The Court of Chancery has issued several decisions in the case; this one dealt with Hudson’s various claims for breach of P3’s LLC agreement. More ›

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Superior Court Finds that Non-Recourse Provision Does Not Bar Fraud Claims Against Non-Seller Defendants

Posted In Breach of Contract, Fraud, Superior Court


Amerimark Interactive LLC v. Amerimark Holdings, C.A. No. N21C-12-175 MMJ CCLD (Del. Super. Nov. 3, 2022)
This decision discusses and applies numerous rules governing fraud claims under Delaware law. For instance, an anti-reliance provision eliminates extra-contractual fraud claims while preserving intra-contractual fraud claims, and a non-recourse provision limits the entities and people against whom a claim can be brought. And, in Online HealthNow, Inv. v. CIP OCL Investments, LLC, 2021 WL 3557857 (Del. Ch. 2021), the Court of Chancery determined that a non-recourse provision did not bar claims against a non-signatory party. Here, the Superior Court applied Online HealthNow and held that fraud claims against non-seller defendants who allegedly were knowingly complicit in contractual fraud were not barred by the non-recourse and anti-reliance provisions of the agreement at issue.

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Chancery Grants Specific Performance For Release of Escrowed Funds, Rejects Sellers’ Representative’s Arguments to Withhold Funds As Inconsistent With Purchase Agreement’s Plain Language and the Implied Covenant of Good Faith and Fair Dealing


Am. Healthcare Admin. Services Inc. v. Aizen, C.A. No. 2019-0793-JTL (Del. Ch. Nov. 18, 2022)
Parties to acquisition agreements often have discretion concerning when to instruct an escrow agent to distribute funds post-closing, but any such discretion is limited by the plain language of the agreement and implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing. This decision addresses the availability of an unclean hands defense to contract claims seeking equitable relief.  More ›

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Chancery Finds Asset Purchase Agreement Required Buyer to Indemnify Seller for Liability Under State Tobacco Settlement

Posted In Breach of Contract, Chancery, M&A


ITG Brands LLC v. Reynolds Am., Inc., C.A. No. 2017-0129-LWW (Del. Ch. Sept. 30, 2022)
Plaintiff acquired four cigarette brands from the defendant under an asset purchase agreement. Prior to entering into the APA, the seller had been making annual payments to the State of Florida based on the annual volume of tobacco product sales under a preexisting settlement agreement. The purchaser did not join the settlement, and the seller stopped making payments to Florida. Florida sued both parties in a Florida court over the lack of payments and obtained a judgment that the seller must continue to make settlement payments based on the purchaser’s own sales of the acquired brands. The seller and purchaser brought claims against each other in the Court of Chancery to determine which party bore responsibility for the Florida judgment. More ›

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Chancery Suggests Alternative Approach To Contracts Providing That Prohibited Acts Are Void Ab Initio


XRI Investment Holdings LLC v. Holifield, et al., C.A. No. 2021-0619-JTL (Del. Ch. Sept. 13, 2022)
Under precedents such as CompoSecure, L.L.C. v. CardUX, LLC (Del. 2018), acts defined by an LLC agreement as “void” or “void ab initio” are incurable, whether through equity or otherwise. For the Court of Chancery in this post-trial decision, applying the CompoSecure holding prohibited the Court from giving effect to the plaintiff’s acquiescence in the transaction at-issue. While respecting and applying CompoSecure, the Court proposed an alternative approach under which equitable doctrines may militate against holding that a challenged act may never be cured. More ›

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Chancery Sustains Claims for Improper Termination of Agreements For Cause in Connection with a Joint Venture to Develop Data Centers for Amazon

Posted In Breach of Contract, Chancery, LLC Agreements


W.D.C. Holdings, LLC v. IPI Partners, LLC, C.A. No. 2020-1026-JTL (Del. Ch. June 22, 2022)
Two entities entered into a joint venture to develop data centers for Amazon. One entity managed the joint venture day to day, and the other controlled the board and had removal rights under certain circumstances. When whistleblowers raised concerns of potential kickbacks and the FBI executed a search warrant on the managing entity’s CEO, the second entity issued letters seeking to remove the CEO and corporate affiliates for cause from their roles in the joint venture and to terminate certain other agreements. The managing entity filed suit to challenge its removal and its affiliates’ removal, and the termination of the other agreements. The defendants moved to dismiss. More ›

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Superior Court Rejects Defendant’s COVID-related Force Majeure Arguments

Posted In Breach of Contract, CCLD, Superior Court


Simon Property Group v. Regal Entertainment Group, C. A. No. N21C-01-204-MMJ (Del. Super. Ct. Jul. 6, 2022) (CCLD)
Simon Property, the landlord, sued Regal Entertainment, the tenant, for breach of a commercial lease, including Regal Entertainment’s failure to pay rent during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 and 2021. Regal Entertainment asserted several affirmative pandemic-related defenses. Upon Simon Property’s motion, the Court rejected Regal Entertainment’s defenses as a matter of law because the parties’ lease contained a force majeure provision broad enough to cover the pandemic events and because those provisions allocated the risk of loss to Regal Entertainment.

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Superior Court Classifies Cryptocurrency as a Security and Calculates Contract Damages Based on Cryptocurrency Valuation

Posted In Breach of Contract, Damages, Superior Court


Diamond Fortress Techs., Inc. v. Everid, Inc., C.A. No. N21C-05-048 PRW CCLD (Del. Super. Ct. Apr. 14, 2022)
Plaintiff Diamond Fortress contracted with the defendant company to provide its software to develop a trading platform for the defendant’s cryptocurrency. In exchange, the defendant agreed to pay plaintiffs in cryptocurrency at the time that defendant made its initial coin offering and at subsequent token distribution events. After the offering and events, the defendant failed, however, to make any payments to the plaintiffs. Plaintiffs filed claims against the defendant for breach of contract, and a default judgment was entered after the defendant failed to appear or respond. After finding that defendant had repudiated and breached the contract, the Court then determined how to calculate damages resulting from breach of a contract to be paid in cryptocurrency, which involved the novel issue under Delaware law of how to classify and value cryptocurrency. More ›

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