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Summaries and analysis of recent Delaware court decisions concerning business-related litigation.

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Showing 3 posts in Fraud Claims.

Superior Court Dismisses Fraud Claim Improperly Boot-Strapped to Breach of Contract Claim

Posted In Fraud Claims

Cont’l Fin. Co., LLC, v. ICS Corp., C.A. No. N19C-07-184 AML (Del. Super. Feb. 20, 2020).

This case represents another example of the application of the “bootstrap doctrine” to define the limits of a contract party’s ability to assert a fraud claim against a counter-party. Ruling on a 12(b)(6) motion to dismiss, the Superior Court permitted plaintiff’s breach of contract claim to proceed but granted dismissal of plaintiff’s fraud claim. The Court reasoned the fraud claim was impermissibly boot-strapped to a breach of a contractual duty, and the plaintiff failed plead damages distinct from those allegedly resulting from the contractual breach.  More ›

Court of Chancery Finds the Delaware Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act Grants Standing for Insureds with Contingent, Unmatured Claims to Sue Insurers, but Dismisses Certain Claims as Time-Barred

Posted In Fraud Claims, Fraudulent Laches, Fraudulent Transfers

Burkhart v. Genworth Fin. Inc., C.A. No. 2018-0691-JRS (Del. Ch. Jan. 31, 2020). 

This case illustrates not only that plaintiffs who have only unmatured and contingent claims against a transferor have standing to seek relief under the Delaware Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act (“DUFTA”), but also that they must comply with that statute’s rules for timely filing to avoid dismissal. Here, the plaintiffs are a class of insureds who hold long-term care insurance policies and insurance agents who receive commission payments from selling the insurance policies. The defendant is Genworth Life Insurance Company (“GLIC”), which underwrote the insurance policies at issue. GLIC allegedly made fraudulent transfers between 2012 and 2014 while GLIC was near insolvency by: (1) declaring $410 million in dividends, and (2) terminating intra-company contracts that provided financial support. The plaintiffs filed an action in 2018 in which they argue that GLIC’s fraudulent transfers violate the DUFTA.  More ›

Co-Founder Squeezed Out in Conversion from LLC to Corporation Adequately Pled Claims for Fraud, Breach of Fiduciary Duties, Aiding and Abetting, and Civil Conspiracy

Posted In Breach of Contract, Fiduciary Duty, Fraud Claims

Ogus v. SportTechie, Inc., C.A. No. 2018-0869-AGB (Del. Ch. Jan. 31, 2020). 

Simon Ogus was a co-founder of a sports-technology news company. He owned 44.5 percent of the LLC’s units, held veto power over major decisions of the company, and had employment protection based on a requirement that the company could only terminate his employment for cause. After outside investors began making large investments in the company, several officers and directors persuaded Mr. Ogus to: (1) approve a conversion of the LLC to a corporation; (2) sign a written consent of stockholders to expand the size of the board of directors; and (3) execute a shareholders agreement that gave the company the option to purchase Mr. Ogus’ shares if his employment was terminated for any reason, at fair market value, as determined in good faith by the board. One month later, the company terminated Mr. Ogus without cause and proposed to purchase his shares. Mr. Ogus brought suit, claiming that the officers and directors conspired to remove him from the company and eliminate his 44.5% interest to enrich themselves, and transfer control of the company to Oak View Group, a private equity & venture fund. Defendants moved to dismiss his suit. More ›